Making MG Cars At Abingdon: Silent Documentary (1931)

author British Pathé   5 год. назад
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MGB Bodyshell Build

In this video we go behind the scenes at British Motor Heritage Limited​, to show you the processes of manufacturing an MGB bodyshell.

The Maxmobile Full Length Documentary

THE MAXMOBILE is a feature length documentary about David A. Maxwell, the man who said no to Henry Ford. David Maxwell invented the first completely hand made car in Canada in 1900. Only one of his cars remains in a museum in Watford, Ontario, Canada, where he lived. He died in 1930. The only remaining car was restored by Ross Saunders and Neil Werden and a number of other men in Watford for the town's centennial. David Maxwell was born August 10, 1861. Orphaned at an early age he ended up in Watford, Ontario, Canada working as a blacksmith for John Baimbridge. Eventually he bought some land across the street and started his own blacksmith shop and built the building himself, which still stands today more than 120 years later. David Maxwell invented lots of things, not the least of which was one of the first cars in Canada. He built the entire car, every part, from the engine to the wheels. He built about half a dozen models and only one remains today. The car to the left is the first one. A modified buggy with a "one lung" motor and a steering tiller and "run flat" tires. Way ahead of his time.

British Motor Corporation Story

BMC was the largest British car company of its day, with (in 1952) 39 percent of British output, producing a wide range of cars under brand names including Austin, Morris, MG, Austin-Healey and Wolseley as well as commercial vehicles and agricultural tractors. The first chairman was Lord Nuffield (William Morris) but he was replaced in August 1952 by Austin's Leonard Lord who continued in that role until his 65th birthday in 1961 but handing over, in theory at least, the managing director responsibilities to his deputy George Harriman in 1956. BMC's headquarters were at the Austin plant at Longbridge, near Birmingham and Austin was the dominant partner in the group mainly because of the chairman. The use of Morris engine designs was dropped within 3 years and all new car designs were coded ADO from "Amalgamated Drawing Office". The Longbridge plant was up to date, having been thoroughly modernised in 1951, and compared very favourably with Nuffield's 16 different and often old fashioned factories scattered over the English Midlands. Austin's management systems however, especially cost control and marketing, were not as good as Nuffield's and as the market changed from a shortage of cars to competition this was to tell. The biggest-selling car, the Mini, was famously analysed by Ford Motor Company who concluded that BMC must be losing £30 on every one sold. The result was that although volumes held up well throughout the BMC era, market share fell as did profitability and hence investment in new models, triggering the 1966 merger with Jaguar Cars to form British Motor Holdings (BMH), and three years later leading to the government sponsored merger of BMH with Leyland Motor Corporation. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Motor_Corporation S062

MG TD Body Build

Assembly of a MG TD Body at the Hutson Motor Company, Web Site:- https://www.hutsonmoco.co.uk/

British Car Trials on The Autobahn: Tests Such As These | British Pathé

The British Motor Corporation (BMC) demonstrates how they tests their cars (Austin A50, Morris Minor, Morris Oxford) by racing them down the German Autobahn and stopping for a compulsory cup of tea in this remarkable footage from the 1950's. "If you want to know how tough a car's engine is, one way to find out is to try flogging it to death, or in more technical terms, testing it to destruction" For Archive Licensing Enquiries Visit: https://goo.gl/W4hZBv Explore Our Online Channel For FULL Documentaries, Fascinating Interviews & Classic Movies: https://goo.gl/7dVe8r #BritishPathé #History #Cars #BMC #Auto #Autobahn #BritishCars Subscribe to the British Pathé YT Channel: https://goo.gl/hV1nkf (FILM ID:2271.04) Begins with the BMC logo and the subtitle: "Amazing Proving Trials for British Motor Corporation Engines." Aerial shots of cars driving fast on a motorway. "If you want to know how tough a car's engine is, one way to find out is to try flogging it to death, or in more technical terms, testing it to destruction" states the narrator. BMC invite the viewer to observe how they test their cars. Interior of an Austin A50. C/U of the steering wheel as a man drives on a German Autobahn. Normal family saloons will be driven for 20,000 miles at an average speed of over a mile a minute. Other cars being tested are seen from the driver's perspective (including a Morris Minor.) C/U of the front of the Austin as it travels along. C/U of front of Morris Minor. The Austin A35 is also seen. Various shots of the cars driving along the motorway. One of the cars pulls into a petrol station. The Morris Oxford is also under trial. Technical details about the compression ratios of the cars are given. Cars are reversed into parking spaces. This is perhaps more like a motorway service station than a mere petrol station. Driver gets out of Morris Minor and pours petrol into the tank trough a funnel. The other drivers fill up with petrol (not from the pumps - from their own cans.) C/U of one of the drivers checking his oil. Two of the drivers beckon another two into the service station for a cup of tea. Panning shot of the sign above the restaurant or cafe. C/U of the speedometer. Driver toots his horn. C/U of the front wheel of one of the cars turning. More shots from inside the car and aerial shots of the cars. It begins to rain and the windscreen wipers are set in motion. C/U of one the drivers. Drivers pull into a petrol station. Cars are filled with petrol, checks are made, drivers make notes. The cars move off again. More driving shots, narrator gives technical details. Special gauges are installed in each car to show oil and water temperature and axle and under bonnet temperature. C/U of the gauges. Stuttgart, the cars pull in after 20,000 miles "every one of them is still going strong...destruction is still quite a long way off." Views of city streets from inside car. Cars pull into a garage where mechanics inspect their engines for wear and tear. The drivers propose that they try another 5,000 miles "to see if they can take that too". Various shots of mechanics performing tests and nice arty shot of the reflection of the garage in a shiny hubcap. C/U of two mechanics working under the bonnet of a Morris Minor. C/U of bonnet of Morris being washed. M/S showing man with a hose rinsing the car. The cars pull out of the garage and drive off. They pass Stuttgart landmarks. C/U of instrument panel. The cars all manage the extra 5,000 with flying colours. More driving shots. "Tests like these are not only a vindication of the designers' skill, but also one more example of the thoroughness with which the BMC test their cars before handing them over to the public. A thoroughness which inspires confidence." BRITISH PATHÉ'S STORY Before television, people came to movie theatres to watch the news. British Pathé was at the forefront of cinematic journalism, blending information with entertainment to popular effect. Over the course of a century, it documented everything from major armed conflicts and seismic political crises to the curious hobbies and eccentric lives of ordinary people. If it happened, British Pathé filmed it. Now considered to be the finest newsreel archive in the world, British Pathé is a treasure trove of 85,000 films unrivalled in their historical and cultural significance. British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/

This silent documentary sponsored by British sports car manufacturer MG (Morris Garages) shows how they construct their vehicles in Abingdon-on-Thames in 1931.

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Film begins with a large MG logo. M/S of a woman sitting in a living room reading a magazine. Intertitle reads: "Hurrah, our M.G. Magna is ready!" A man comes into the living room and shows his wife a letter. They leave the house together.

L/S of a building with a sign on the outside: "The MG Car Co." A car drives past the building towards the camera. Interior of the building. The couple come in and are greeted by the salesman. He speaks into a stick style telephone and another man comes in and shakes the hands of the husband and wife. "On our way to get the car let us go round the factory."

"The Assembly Lines" High angle shot of the factory floor with MGs under construction. Various high angle shots of cars being assembled. C/U of two men working together on part of the car. Screws are tightened, axles are attached, wheels are affixed etc. The radiator is lowered onto the front of the car, the bodywork is attached, steering wheel is put in place etc. We see the car taking shape through dissolves. Panning shot of the factory floor as men work on the assembly lines. Cars are moved along as each stage is completed. High angle shot of long line of assembled cars without bodywork.

"Where chassis frames are built up" A different part of the factory is featured. Two men work together building up a chassis. Various shots of men at work.

"The Test Department, where the chassis receive final adjustments." High angle shot of men at work testing the cars. Brakes are tested on a machine. M/S of the car running on a testing machine. C/U of wheel turning in place. Wheels are tested for alignment. A man drives one of the cars onto the machine. C/U of wheel alignment gauge.

The car is driven backwards and forwards to test the alignment.

"With a temporary body fitted the car now goes for its road test." L/S of the temporary body being fitted. A number plate is screwed onto the front of the car. A machine called "The Comparator" is used to ascertain the maximum speed of the car in various gears. A man climbs into a car and puts it through its paces. C/U of the special speedometer. Another man stands by the car with a clipboard. He makes notes on various speeds. "All speedometers are tested for accuracy on this machine." C/U of man checking speedometers on the machine.

"The Power Unit Shop, where engine subassemblies are carried out." M/S at men assembling engines. Various shots of the men at work. Panning shot of men testing engines. We then see footage of the Machine Shop. Chassis frame side members are drilled and small components are manufactured. Panning shot of the factory floor. "Sheet metal blanks are cut to shape by Oxyacetylene plant." C/U of metal being cut then hammered through the sheet.

"In the Paint Shop, where workshop grey is changed to cheery colours." L/S of man painting MG with a spray gun. C/U of the spray gun. Various shots of bodywork being sprayed. Bodies are prepared for mounting in the Body Shop. Panning shots of men at work. We then see the "body finishing lines."

"One of the famous Montlhery Midgets." M/S of two men checking the finishing of the car upholstery. Wing mirrors and the boot are checked.

"Service. The reception department, the factory consulting room." A woman driver and her female passenger arrive in the servicing department. A man opens the bonnet of the car, looks inside and makes some notes. High angle shot of the Service Repair Bay and the Dispatch Department. The husband and wife seen earlier are taken to their new car. They climb in. Intertitle reads: "Goodbye, and many happy "Safety Fast" miles. Salesman shakes hands with the couple. The couple drive off, we see them moving out of the factory from behind. Film ends with company logo title.

"The MG Car Company Ltd. Abingdon-on-Thames."

BRITISH PATHÉ'S STORY
Before television, people came to movie theatres to watch the news. British Pathé was at the forefront of cinematic journalism, blending information with entertainment to popular effect. Over the course of a century, it documented everything from major armed conflicts and seismic political crises to the curious hobbies and eccentric lives of ordinary people. If it happened, British Pathé filmed it.

Now considered to be the finest newsreel archive in the world, British Pathé is a treasure trove of 85,000 films unrivalled in their historical and cultural significance.

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