Wishes on Wheels - Chrysler Forward Look

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Chrysler Master Tech - 1951, Volume 4-8 FirePower Engine Facts

Chrysler Master Tech - 1951, Volume 4-8 FirePower Engine Facts Chrysler is a registered trademark of Chrysler LLC. Master Tech series training manuals and videos are the property of Chrysler LLC. MyMopar.com

The Unfortunate History of the AMC Pacer - Documentary Film

Behind all the jokes and insults, the AMC Pacer is actually a car with a great deal of history. It began as radical new design from an underdog company. In an attempt to combat the big, bland, boxy cars from Detroit's "Big Three," little American Motors Corporation decided to build something a little different. Their one-eyed car stylist Dick Teague proposed a small, wide car with big windows and smooth aerodynamics. Americans had never seen anything like it. This in-depth documentary tells the true story of the Pacer. Unbeknownst to many, the car persevered through manufacturing setbacks, government regulations, and many other troubles. Featuring a ton of old car advertisements and rare footage of AMC's factory, the film helps paint a picture of the Pacer's world. Director Joe Ligo sits down with AMC stylist Vincent Geraci, author Patrick Foster, and television personalities John Davis and Pat Goss from PBS's MotorWeek.

Detroit Arsenal Tank Plant: "Assembly Lines of Defense" circa 1941 Chrysler Corporation

more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html Chrysler Detroit Arsenal Tank Plant (DATP) "This movie depicts construction and start of production in the Chrysler Tank Arsenal." The tank being built in the film is the Medium Tank M3 "Lee". Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detroit_Arsenal_(Warren,_Michigan) Detroit Arsenal (DTA), formerly Detroit Arsenal Tank Plant (DATP) was the first manufacturing plant ever built for the mass production of tanks in the United States. Established in 1940 under Chrysler, this plant was owned by the U.S. government until 1996. It was designed by architect Albert Kahn. The building was designed originally as a "dual production facility, so that it could make armaments and be turned into peaceful production at war's end. Notwithstanding its name, the 113-acre (0.46 km2) site was located in Warren, Michigan, Detroit's largest suburb. Chrysler's construction effort at the plant in 1941 was one of the fastest on record. During World War II, the Detroit Arsenal Tank Plant built a quarter of the 89,568 tanks produced in the U.S. overall. The Korean War boosted production for the first time since World War II had ended; the government would suspend tank production after each war. In May 1952, Chrysler resumed control from the army, which had been unable to ramp up production. As a Government-Owned, Contractor Operated (GOCO) facility, Chrysler retained operational control of the production facility until March 1982, when Chrysler sold its Chrysler Defense division to General Dynamics Land Systems. General Dynamics produced the M1 Abrams tank at the facility (and at another plant in Lima, Ohio) until 1996, when the plant was closed and tank assembly and maintenance operations were consolidated at the Lima plant. The plant and some of the adjoining property were transferred to the City of Warren in 2001. The site of the original tank plant has been parcelled up and is now dedicated to civilian uses. This important production site of the Arsenal of Democracy is memorialized by a Michigan Historical Marker. The structure of the plant was designed to survive bombardment by the weapons of the day. It included 3-foot-thick (0.91 m) concrete walls in some areas and a reinforced roof with slats to direct bombs away from vulnerable windows and exhaust fans. The portion of the property not sold to the city remains an active Army facility with many agencies present. The installation is managed by Installation Management Command (IMCOM) and hosts the headquarters of the United States Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) and the United States Army TACOM Life Cycle Management Command. TACOM continues to function at the location, is in fact in a major building boom as of 2010... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M3_Lee The Medium Tank M3 was an American tank used during World War II. In Britain the tank was called by two names based on the turret configuration. Tanks employing US pattern turrets were called the "Lee", named after Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Variants using British pattern turrets were known as "Grant", named after U.S. General Ulysses S. Grant. Design commenced in July 1940 and the first M3s were operational in late 1941. The U.S. Army needed a good tank and coupled with the United Kingdom's demand for 3,650 medium tanks immediately, the Lee began production by late 1940. The design was a compromise meant to produce a tank as soon as possible. The M3 had considerable firepower as it was well armed and provided good protection, but had certain serious drawbacks in its general design and shape, such as: a high silhouette, an archaic sponson mounting of the main gun, riveted construction, and poor off-road performance. Its overall performance was not satisfactory and the tank was withdrawn from front line duty — except in the remote areas of the Asian Theater by British forces as late as mid-1944 or later — as soon as the M4 Sherman became available in large numbers...

Body Beautiful, 1955

General Motors Body By Fisher. Transferred from an original 35mm print. Footage from this film is available for licensing from http://www.globalimageworks.com

Virgil Exner Mopars

On this episode of My Classic Car, Dennis checks out Virgil Exner designed Mopars. My Classic Car Season 16 Episode 24. Website - http://www.myclassiccar.com Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/myclassiccar Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/myclassiccar Google+ - https://plus.google.com/103516592864435202958

Forward Look was a design theme employed by Virgil Exner in styling the 1955 through 1961 Chrysler Corporation vehicles.
When Exner joined Chrysler, the company's vehicles were being fashioned by engineers instead of designers, and so were considered outmoded, unstylish designs. Exner fought to change this structuring, and got control over the design process, including the clay prototypes and the die models used to create production tooling.
300C

Production 1957
After seeing the P-38-inspired tailfins on the 1948 Cadillac, Exner adopted fins as a central element of his vehicle designs. He believed in the aerodynamic benefits of the fins, and even used wind tunnel testing at the University of Michigan—but he also liked their visual effects on the car. Exner lowered the roofline and made the cars sleeker, smoother, and more aggressive. In 1955, Chrysler introduced "The New 100-Million Dollar Look". With a long hood and short deck, the wedgelike designs of the Chrysler 300 letter series and revised 1957 models suddenly brought the company to the forefront of design, with Ford and General Motors quickly working to catch up. The 1957 Plymouths were advertised with the slogan, "Suddenly, it's 1960!"


A Mopar oil filter from the late 1950s bears the Forward Look logo
Fins soon lost popularity. By the late 1950s Cadillac, Chrysler and many other marques had escalated the size of fins until some thought they were stylistically questionable, and they became a symbol of American excess in the early 60s. 1961 is considered the last of the "Forward Look" designs. The 1962's were referred to as "plucked chickens" by Exner.

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