Wright R-1820 Cyclone/Boeing B-17-F Engine Installation: Engine Buildup ~ 1943 US Army Air Forces

author Jeff Quitney   1 год. назад
40,988 views

315 Like   16 Dislike

Video from the Past [31] - Building a Bomber (1941)

Video from the Past [31] - Building a Bomber (1941) Documentary short film depicting the construction of the Martin B-26 medium bomber and its deployment to the U.S. Army Air Corps, including both engineering techniques and flight characteristics. The Martin B-26 Marauder was a World War II twin-engined medium bomber built by the Glenn L. Martin Company. First used in the Pacific Theater in early 1942, it was also used in the Mediterranean Theater and in Western Europe. After entering service with the U.S. Army, the aircraft received the reputation of a "Widowmaker" due to the early models' high accident rate during takeoffs and landings. The Marauder had to be flown at exact airspeeds, particularly on final runway approach and when one engine was out. The 150 mph (241 km/h) speed on short final runway approach was intimidating to pilots who were used to much slower speeds, and whenever they slowed down below what the manual stated, the aircraft would stall and crash. The B-26 became a safer aircraft once crews were re-trained, and after aerodynamics modifications (an increase of wingspan and wing angle-of-incidence to give better takeoff performance, and a larger vertical stabilizer and rudder). After aerodynamic and design changes, the aircraft distinguished itself as "the chief bombardment weapon on the Western Front" according to a United States Army Air Forces dispatch from 1946. The Marauder ended World War II with the lowest loss rate of any USAAF bomber.[

Wright 1820 Cyclone

Wright 1820 Cyclone restoration photos and engine start up

Clerget 9B Assembly Movie (HD)

The Clerget 9B Assembling Movie. Based on a true story about Assembling the French Clerget 9B Aero Engine.

Engines for Superbombers

During World War Two Chrysler built the engines for the Boeing B29 Super Fortress at its Dodge plant in Chicago. The B29 was a long range bomber that dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. After the War, the factory was bought by Preston Tucker and used to build his Tucker automobiles. S146

Boeing B-29 Superfortress Flight Engineer -1944

I've uploaded a new HD restoration of this film! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jwEfNciYH7U "Excellent B-29 footage here, showing the aircraft in detail, inside and out. Systems management on the very complex (and often unreliable) B-29 was a critical function." Zeno, Zeno's Warbird Videos http://zenoswarbirdvideos.com. Seeing this video full screen,plus a lot more on our 'Boeing B-29 Superforts Go to War Vol. 2' DVD. http://bit.ly/SwOsRH Digitally restored video & audio. The Flight Engineer was responsible for everything from an extensive per-flight check, through managing engines and other critical systems in flight to ensuring that all necessary repairs and maintenance were preformed after landing. All aspects of an Engineer's role are shown in detail in a complete mission in this film. Appropriately for the B-29, the flight is far from trouble free, adding an extra dimension of realism. And as an added bonus, the role of the the Engineer is played by Hollywood legend John Payne and the narration is memorably delivered by Ronald Reagan.

B-17 playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLE644A4A2C089142F

World War II playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3E5ED4749AE3CD2C

more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/

Ott, Pinky, Chuck, and Mel show us how to prepare a Wright R-1820 Cyclone engine for installation on a B-17F Flying Fortress Bomber.

Public domain film, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wright_R-1820_Cyclone

The Wright R-1820 Cyclone 9 was an American radial engine developed by Curtiss-Wright, widely used on aircraft in the 1930s through 1950s. It was produced under license in Spain as the Hispano-Suiza 9V or Hispano-Wright 9V, and in the Soviet Union as the Shvetsov M-25...

Design and development

The R-1820 Cyclone 9 represented a further development of the Wright P-2 engine dating back to 1925. Featuring a greater displacement and a host of improvements, the R-1820 entered production in 1931. The engine remained in production well into the 1950s.

The R-1820 was built under license by Lycoming, Pratt & Whitney Canada, and also, during World War II, by the Studebaker Corporation. The Soviet Union had purchased a license for the design, and the Shvetsov OKB was formed to produce the engine as the M-25, with the R-1820's general design features used by the Shvetsov design bureau for many of their future radials for the Soviet air forces through the 1940s and onwards. In Spain the R-1820 was license-built as the Hispano-Suiza 9V or Hispano-Wright 9V.

The R-1820 was at the heart of many famous aircraft including early Douglas airliners (the prototype DC-1, the DC-2, the first civil versions of the DC-3, and the limited-production DC-5), every wartime example of the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress and Douglas SBD Dauntless bombers, the early versions of the Polikarpov I-16 fighter (as the M-25), and the Piasecki H-21 helicopter.

The R-1820 also found limited use in armoured vehicles. The G-200 variant developed 900 hp (670 kW) at 2,300 rpm and powered the M6 Heavy Tank. The Wright RD-1820 was converted to a diesel by Caterpillar Inc. as the D-200 and produced 450 hp (340 kW) at 2,000 rpm in the M4A6 Sherman...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_B-17_Flying_Fortress

The Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress is a four-engine heavy bomber developed in the 1930s for the United States Army Air Corps (USAAC). Competing against Douglas and Martin for a contract to build 200 bombers, the Boeing entry outperformed both competitors and exceeded the air corps' performance specifications. Although Boeing lost the contract because the prototype crashed, the air corps ordered 13 more B-17s for further evaluation. From its introduction in 1938, the B-17 Flying Fortress evolved through numerous design advances.

The B-17 was primarily employed by the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) in the daylight strategic bombing campaign of World War II against German industrial and military targets...

Of the 1.5 million tonnes of bombs dropped on Germany and its occupied territories by U.S. aircraft, 640,000 tonnes were dropped from B-17s. In addition to its role as a bomber, the B-17 was also employed as a transport, antisubmarine aircraft, drone controller, and search-and-rescue aircraft.

As of May 2015, ten aircraft remain airworthy. None of them are combat veterans. Dozens more are in storage or on static display. The oldest of these is a D-series veteran of combat in the Pacific and the Caribbean...

Comments for video: