Democracy 3 - Socialist Germany Ep. 5 - Resolving Issues

author FirstCenturion753   4 мес. назад
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Why I Left Greenpeace

Patrick Moore explains why he helped to create Greenpeace, and why he decided to leave it. What began as a mission to improve the environment for the sake of humanity became a political movement in which humanity became the villain and hard science a non-issue. Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: In 1971 I helped found an environmental group in the basement of a Unitarian church in Vancouver, Canada. Fifteen years later, it had grown into an international powerhouse. We were making headlines every month. I was famous. And then I walked out the door. The mission, once noble, had become corrupted -- political agendas and fear mongering trumped science and truth. Here's how it happened. When I was studying for my PhD in ecology at the University of British Columbia, I joined a small activist group called the Don't Make a Wave Committee. It was the height of the Cold War; the Vietnam War was raging. I became radicalized by these realities and by the emerging consciousness of the environment. The mission of the Don't Make a Wave Committee was to launch an ocean-going campaign against US hydrogen bomb testing in Alaska, a symbol of our opposition to nuclear war. As one of our early meetings was breaking up, someone said, "Peace," A reply came, "Why don't we make it a green peace," and a new movement was born. Green was for the environment and peace was for the people. We named our boat "The Greenpeace" and I joined the 12-person crew for a voyage of protest. We didn't stop that H-bomb test but it was the last hydrogen bomb the United States ever detonated. We had won a major victory. In 1975, Greenpeace took a sharp turn away from our anti-nuclear efforts and set out to Save the Whales, sailing the high seas to confront Russian and Japanese whalers. The footage we shot -- young protesters positioned between harpoons and fleeing whales -- was shown on TV around the world. Public donations poured in. By the early 1980s we were campaigning against toxic waste, air pollution, trophy hunting, and the live capture of orca whales. But I began to feel uncomfortable with the course my fellow directors were taking. I found myself the only one of six international directors with a formal science background. We were now tackling subjects that involved complex issues of toxicology, chemistry, and human health. You don't need a PhD in marine biology to know it's a good thing to save whales from extinction. But when you're analyzing which chemicals to ban, you need to know some science. And the first lesson of ecology is that we are all interconnected. Humans are part of nature, not separate from it. Many other species, disease agents and their carriers, for example, are our enemies and we have the moral obligation to protect human beings from these enemies. Biodiversity is not always our friend. I had noticed something else. As we grew into an international organization with over $100 million a year coming in, a big change in attitude had occurred. The "peace" in Greenpeace had faded away. Only the "green" part seemed to matter now. Humans, to use Greenpeace language, had become "the enemies of the Earth." Putting an end to industrial growth and banning many useful technologies and chemicals became common themes of the movement. Science and logic no longer held sway. Sensationalism, misinformation, and fear were what we used to promote our campaigns. For the complete script, visit https://www.prageru.com/videos/why-i-left-greenpeace

Capitalism will eat democracy -- unless we speak up | Yanis Varoufakis

Have you wondered why politicians aren't what they used to be, why governments seem unable to solve real problems? Economist Yanis Varoufakis, the former Minister of Finance for Greece, says that it's because you can be in politics today but not be in power — because real power now belongs to those who control the economy. He believes that the mega-rich and corporations are cannibalizing the political sphere, causing financial crisis. In this talk, hear his dream for a world in which capital and labor no longer struggle against each other, "one that is simultaneously libertarian, Marxist and Keynesian." TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector

Restoring the Ottoman Empire - GPS 4 pt. 6 - Oil Industry

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The European Union Explained*

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Democracy 3: Africa | Zambia - Year 1

In my latest Democracy 3 series, we turn our attention to the troubled nation of Zambia, where the people are sick, impoverished, and crime is running rampant. The nation seems to be in a complete freefall. Can we turn things around? A review copy of this expansion was provided by Positech Games. Democracy 3 | USA ► https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNn7c31H7Njmj22X2Kb-xWf5hyOIXmfCp Democracy 3 | Germany ► https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNn7c31H7NjmDLDGLE77U6lEZFqQ27pIO Democracy 3 | Canada ► https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNn7c31H7NjmccG4r0SbVW8JLTNAvzLn8 Democracy 3 | Holy United Kingdom ► https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNn7c31H7NjngqVorETnfXNQuu_VrZNQx Democracy 3 | France ► https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNn7c31H7Njl8rTzD1-mW7sQOw_EbnBBi Democracy 3: Africa | Ghana ► https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNn7c31H7Njk71mLZmFHy2AOnIbxP9wLU Democracy 3: Africa | Egypt► https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNn7c31H7NjlXp1Bb43rsAs8StC6ef5CJ Subscribe Today ► http://www.ittybittyurl.com/pravusgaming No copyright infringement intended. Democracy 3: Africa copyright is owned by their respective owners which includes but is not limited to Positech Games. I did not make the game (or assets) and do not claim to. I do claim recording the gameplay and associated commentary.

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